President Trump and Hydroxychloroquine

This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion
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The President Is Taking the Drug to Ward Off Any COVID Symptoms

In a recent presser, President Donald Trump revealed that was taking hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) (plus zinc) as an off-label preventative option in consultation with his personal White House physician. The drug has been around for years as an antimalarial treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control, choloroquine is a 300-mg pill that can be taken once a week prior to traveling to destinations with widespread malaria cases. There are potential side effects, as with any drug out there, such as cardiac arrhythmia, so HCQ should only be taken under a doctor’s supervision.

“After numerous discussions [the president] and I had about regarding the evidence for and against the use of hydroxychloroquine, we concluded the potential benefit from treatment outweighed the relative risks,” said Dr. Sean Conley in a statement.

“Hydroxychloroquine is what’s known as an analog of chloroquine, meaning the two have similar structures but different chemical and biological properties. The former is considered the less toxic derivative, according to studies,” CNN explained.

What virologists and other medical scientists suggest that chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine is an intracellular disruptor. In intracellular functionality, a process called autophagy occurs, where cells produce and recycle waste continually through a cell’s lysosomes. A properly functioning cellular waste cycle must meet a certain pH level for it to work. 

HCQ With a Doctor’s Approval

In an essay for New Right Network, Dr. David Samadi, a board-certified urologic oncologist expert and robotic surgeon, explained that President Trump is justified in using HCQ as a prophylactic:

“I wholeheartedly support President Trump in his decision. He’s the most powerful man in the world and has the right to make this decision with his doctor’s approval. Other than some struggles with high cholesterol, he appears to have no other health conditions that would disqualify him from taking this drug….

”For a drug that was FDA-approved as being safe and effective approximately 60 years ago, hydroxychloroquine has been used successfully to treat both malaria and autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. However it has been under intense scrutiny the minute the president took a liking to the medication by bringing attention to it. But like any medications, there are risks and benefits to taking hydroxycholoroquine. Before writing a prescription to a patient for this drug, all doctors need to weigh their decisions carefully…’

“Though he is daily criticized for practically every move he makes, when it comes to hydryoxychloroquine for COVID-19, there was little time to do double-blind randomized clinical trials that normally take months if not years to complete. He made the decision for himself, with the approval of his doctor, and we know he is not shy about telling the world.” 

HCQ Can Be An Effective Treatment for Some COVID-19 Patients

Chloroquine acts as an agent that disrupts that waste-delivery process. The reason is that the coronovirus hitches a ride on the cells that deliver waste to the lysosomes which cause the viral pathogen to continue moving back and forth, thus creating the problems we have been seeing in carriers. If HCQ is known to disrupt the lysosomic waste delivery cycle, it will halt the spread of the coronovirus on an intracellular level, particularly when a virus gets to the nucleus of the cell and takes it over. 

According to immunology and virology data, once a virus hits the nucleus of a cell, it basically becomes a virus-making machine, which is how infections spread throughout a person’s system. The virus has to get there, and if the traffic slows to a halt, the virus won’t reach the nucleus, thus allowing it to be fought by the immune system in a generally more effective way.  

Some scientists believe that when paired with zinc, HCQ’s bioactivity is very effective. In addition, the efficacy of the drug is so potent that it can also be toxic when given its base dosage. The risk of HCQ’s toxicity is high but the effectiveness of the drug is also high when combating COVID-19.  It all depends on the ratio of HCQ administered; it appears that healthcare professionals who have taken it have experienced a significant reduction in infection levels. A neuroscientist discusses the process and the efficacy of HCQ in this video.

The Loud Silence of the Media

When the president announced his HCQ regimen, the reporters in the room went stir crazy. The hostile media continued its Trump Derangement Syndrome similar to when he first publicly mentioned the drug. Then we all heard about the Arizona woman who allegedly gave her husband fish tank cleaner containing chloroquine phosphate (a completely different form of the chemical) that resulted in his death. The woman implied that she listened to the president touting HCQ and that led the couple to consume the toxic ingredient.

According to the Washington Free Beacon, she is a Democrat who donated to Democrat candidates and groups. Local homicide detectives are investigating the man’s passing, which they say is routine for all deaths other than for natural causes.

The media had a field day, but turns out they reported the story dishonestly. They also downplayed or ignored that she was hardly a Trump supporter. Wheat the media should have been doing all along is providing a balanced report on the drug’s plusses and minuses, rather than engaging in sensationalism.

Let the People Decide

Between the reports of the extreme bioactivity of the HCQ along with the toxicity of the drug, too many medical professionals along with the news media remain silent. Whether it’s lying by omission or actively lying, the question remains: Shouldn’t we let individuals — in consultation with their family doctor — decide? 

Does HCQ have side effects? Of course, just like with any prescription medicine. Has it been proven to treat coronavirus? In some cases, yes, based on certain studies and findings, although more clinical trials are pending. So why is there no positive, or at least even-handed media coverage?  Why haven’t there been more medical professionals addressing both the efficacy and the toxicity of this drug and letting patients and their treating physicians decide for themselves? 

These questions need to be answered, but one thing is certain: The president is looking pretty healthy for a man who’s been taking a drug that could be toxic.