‘All Lives Matter’: After Derek Chauvin Gets Sentenced To 22.5 Years In Prison, George Floyd’s Brother Sparks Outrage Among Some Activists After Going Off BLM Narrative

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From Conservative Brief:

The family of George Floyd, who wanted the maximum sentence of 30 years, were nonetheless pleased with the sentencing.

But George Floyd’s brother said the three words that drive certain progressives insane after the sentence was rendered.

“I just want to reiterate: not just black lives matter, all lives matter,” Philonise Floyd said outside of the courthouse after the sentencing/.

“We need to stand up and fight. Can’t get comfortable because when you get comfortable, people forget about you,” he said.

Philonise Floyd has been front and center since his brother’s death, preaching peace and calm as riots and looting ensued.

“If I’m not over here messing up my community, then what are y’all doing?… That’s not gonna bring my brother back at all … Let’s do it a different way,” he said after the first week of rioting.

But his comments of “all lives matter” did not sit well with many in the black community who see the phrase as some kind of anti-black sentiment.

“Get George Floyd brother off the mic, this mf just said all lives matter. You can tell this family been paid by the way they’re talking smh, “ one Twitter user said.

“George Floyd brother is ending his speech with an ‘all lives matter,’” another said with a gif showing disgust.

“I know George Floyd brother didn’t end his statement with all lives matter man,” another person said.

“George Floyd’s brother just made the conservative highlight reel. ‘Not only do Black Lives Matter, but ALL lives matter’ smh,” another Twitter user said.

“I found it weird when George Floyd brother said ‘I’m apart of a fraternity of families, not the likeable kind.’ Then goes to say ‘all lives matter’ What fraternity are you apart of where you give the oppressors talking points in a speech about your brother being lynched live?” another person who was furious at Floyd said.

As for Chauvin, it will be a long time before he gets out of prison, CNN reported.

Chauvin, in a light gray suit and tie and white shirt, spoke briefly before the sentence was imposed, offering his “condolences to the Floyd family.”

Under Minnesota law, Chauvin will have to serve two-thirds of his sentence, or 15 years — and he will be eligible for supervised release for the remaining seven and a half years.

The sentence exceeds the Minnesota sentencing guideline range of 10 years and eight months to 15 years for the crime. Floyd’s death sparked massive protests across the nation over police brutality.

Judge Peter Cahill said the sentence was not based on emotion or public opinion. He wanted to “acknowledge the deep and tremendous pain that all of the families are feeling, especially the Floyd family,” the judge said.

In a 22 page memorandum, Cahill wrote that two aggravating factors warranted a harsher sentence — that Chauvin “abused his position of trust or authority” and treated Floyd with “particular cruelty.” Chauvin, the judge wrote, treated Floyd “without respect and denied him the dignity owed to all human beings.”

He said that Chauvin “objectively remained indifferent to Mr. Floyd’s pleas’ even as Mr. Floyd was begging for his life and obviously terrified by the knowledge that he was likely to die.”

“Mr. Chauvin’s prolonged restraint of Mr. Floyd was also much longer and more painful than the typical scenario in a second-degree or third-degree murder or second-degree manslaughter case,”

This article was originally posted at Conservative Brief.