Veterans Day: A History of Remembrance

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A Day of Recognition to Commemorate Our Veterans

Each November 11, Americans come together to honor all of our veterans. From the American Revolution to Middle Eastern conflicts, our soldiers have endured it all to provide freedom and security, not just for ourselves, but for others.

American troops have defeated Nazism, Communism, radical Islamic terrorism, and many other factions bent on causing harm to the world. A century ago, the conflict that was supposed to be the “War to End All Wars” came to an end. Since then, a day of recognition for our veterans has been observed annually.

The Roots of Veteran’s Day: World War I

On November 11, 1918, an armistice was signed. This agreement brought an end to the largest conflict ever seen at the time. With the start of the war in 1914, new technology – the likes of which had never before been seen – was used in battle. These included airplanes, armored vehicles, machine guns, and zeppelins. Some of the globe’s largest and most destructive battles resulted from this conflict.

Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you: Jesus Christ and the American soldier. One died for your soul, the other died for your freedom.”

The Battle of the Somme was fatal, and as roughly a million men were killed among the British, French, and German armies. The United States entered the war in 1917, and the following year, the Central Powers surrendered. Following the signing of the armistice, a national day of recognition was sought to commemorate all veterans and their service in World War I, known as Armistice Day.

Post-WWI

Armistice Day was “dedicated to the cause of world peace.” In 1939, however, the world was plunged into another global conflict. World War II lasted six years and claimed the lives of over 60 million people. Then, in 1950, the Korean War began.

This was the first proxy conflict of the Cold War, with the United States and the Soviet Union fighting one another indirectly through their respective capitalist and communist allies. The Korean War ended in 1953 with an armistice and a stalemate. One year later, Armistice Day was changed to Veteran’s Day, so that veterans of all conflicts could be honored.

From Past to Present

American soldiers have endured conflicts across all ranges of the globe. They were successful in repelling and defeating the largest empire in the world during the conception of America. They preserved the Union and helped abolish slavery in the middle of the 19th century. They fought gallantly against the Spanish at San Juan Hill.

In 1918, they helped the Allies ensure a victory against the Central Powers in what was the largest conflict the world had ever seen at the time. In 1945, they brought an end to the evils of Nazi Germany and the Japanese Empire. In Korea and Vietnam, they sought to bring an end to the expansion of communism.

In Desert Storm, our soldiers prevented the expansion of Saddam Hussein’s dictatorial Iraqi regime. During the subsequent Middle Eastern conflicts that have followed, our veterans have kept not just America, but the world, safe from radical Islamic threats.

The American soldier has always been willing to sacrifice life and limb for his or her country, and for that, we owe them gratitude beyond words. A famous quote reads, “Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you: Jesus Christ and the American soldier. One died for your soul, the other died for your freedom.” To our veterans, we greatly say, “Thank you.”

Author Profile

Garrett Smith
Garrett Smith is a writer for NRN and recent graduate from Western Carolina University. He is a history major with a minor in political science. As a Conservative, Smith believes that the Left has taken over America's education system, which means they now control its history. To make their fellow Americans feel guilty, they often invoke a feeling of "American Shame" in students, indoctrinating them with radical, un-American ideas. It is Smith's goal to teach Americans the true history of America, and along with this, use its history to explain what makes us great.