Canada: Justice minister says ‘there’s no absolute right to own private property in the country’

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently stated that Canadians do not have a right to defend themselves with guns, despite his security detail having guns to protect him. Now, Trudeau’s Justice Minister David Lametti has said: “There is no ‘absolute’ right for one to own private property in the country.”

Lametti is referencing people who purchased their private property. Totalitarian regimes that strip away the rights of their citizens always conjure up “valid” excuses to do so.

While the Canadian government is pointing fingers at Russia, it has dirt in its own backyard.

Canada froze the accounts of people who supported the Freedom Convoy, and now Bill C-19 would allow the government to seize property owned by Russians in Canada.

The money seized would then be used to aid Ukraine’s recovery, but does this mean that the government has a right under this new law (now in second reading) to arbitrarily target any Russian? What checks and balances are there to hold the Trudeau government accountable to due process? Transparency is currently lacking. Another concern is the question of what other law or “emergency measure” might the Trudeau government conjure up in the future as it continues to move in a totalitarian direction.

Lametti’s words that “there is no absolute right for one to own private property in Canada” should be taken as an omen, given the Trudeau government’s continue current trajectory.

“Canadian justice minister says there is no ‘absolute’ right to own private property,” by Anthony Murdoch, LifeSite News, June 14, 2022:

OTTAWA (LifeSiteNews) – Canadian Justice Minister David Lametti claimed last week that there is no “absolute” right for one to own private property in the country .

Lametti was responding to questions by reporters about Bill C-19, which would allow the government to seize property owned by Russians in Canada.

“Well, look, we’ll obviously tailor the provisions so that it can withstand a court challenge. You don’t have an absolute right to own private property in Canada,” Lametti said.

“There are steps that are taken when expropriations happen at whatever level of government, and we’ll be sure to stay within those boundaries.”

If Bill C-19 becomes law, it would give the federal government the power to “seize and cause the forfeiture and disposal of assets held by sanctioned people and entities, to support Canada’s participation in the Russian Elites, Proxies, and Oligarchs Task force in light of Russia’s illegal invasion of Ukraine.”

The bill is currently at second reading in Canada’s senate after passing in the House of Commons last Thursday.

The legislation would also ban “foreign investment in Canadian housing” for two years.

Some lawyers have said that a law giving the government the power to seize Russian assets at will could be a violation of international law.

David Kleimann, who works as a researcher and adviser on international law with a Brussels-based think tank, said, “I believe that the legal question is relatively clear here, that such an action or such procedures would violate international law.”….

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