South Africa: The Coca-Cola Company Needs to Speak Out

This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion
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A Coca-Cola First, Then the Crimewave

Back in 1987, Coca Cola was the first major corporation to link its divestment from South Africa to Apartheid. The company’s corporate intentions were good, but the people of South Africa need Coca Cola’s influence again. In South Africa, crime is out of control: the country is a murder capital. It also is a rape capital, making some war zones look good by comparison.

Even the South African Police Service too often play defense, abandoning some remote police stations during hours of darkness. Occasionally they themselves fall victim to armed robbery and burglary while on duty.  Infrastructure is decaying, the economy is collapsing, electricity and basic services are spotty at best, and corruption is rampant. All of this, and more, is due to the policies of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) and its allies.

To distract from their corruption and incompetence, the ANC and others blame minorities, especially whites. This fans the flames of racial and ethnic unrest. We see it manifesting itself in outbreaks of xenophobic violence and an ongoing ethnic cleansing of rural areas. Like the brutal, terroristic, Farm Attack phenomenon. It seems to be increasing, with almost a blind eye by the ANC. Western media doesn’t believe that it is as common as claimed.

Organizations Are Pushing Expropriation

Meanwhile, the ANC is pushing forward with its agenda of Expropriation Without Compensation. The program is billed as a means to take agricultural property from whites and give it to blacks. Nearly all of the blacks they hope to benefit are interested in jobs, basic services, and security, not distant farmland. The Expropriation Mandate will, in fact, allow those in power to seize anything. Such as urban real estate, even pensions and intellectual property, from anyone. This is basically what the militant, Marxist extremists in the surprisingly powerful Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) have discussed.

What Coca-Cola Needs To Do

South Africa is important to Coca-Cola’s operations in southern and eastern Africa. Should South Africa continue on this trajectory, Coca Cola’s own interests will inevitably be threatened. A deal among the players may result in a hands-off policy regarding Coke’s assets. It still may cost the company. The ongoing collapse of South Africa can easily result in destruction and seizure of whatever is left of value. There could be violence against anyone in South Africa. No one and nothing will be safe.

Recently, I reviewed records at the US Federal Election Commission (FEC). I counted nine Political Action Committees (PACs) that have been associated with Coca-Cola. Some of these records are historical, but I saw three Coca-Cola-affiliated PACs active in the current campaign cycle. Together they have raised over $350,000 to put toward non-partisan good governance. It is good that such a well-established and well-respected firm as Coca-Cola takes their civic duties here so seriously.

Coca-Cola needs to again take an interest in the welfare of the people of South Africa. They need to denounce the blatant corruption and theft of State resources. Calling attention to the outrageous crime that affects all South Africans. Coca-Cola needs to speak out against the demonization of whites. Not only by radical fringe groups such as the Black First Land First organization (BLF). Even by the more mainstream EFF and the ruling ANC.

Pressuring Coke to Do The Right Thing

I have begun to boycott the products of Coca-Cola and all its subsidiaries. I will continue to do so. This will continue until Coca-Cola publicly does what it can to address the devolving situation in South Africa. With enough pressure, they will change their position from one of neutrality to concern. Even if it’s only to protect their bottom-line.

Author Profile

Mark Williamson
Mark Williamson
Mark Williamson is a writer for NRN and a high school math teacher. He's a former USAF Intelligence Applications Officer and graduate of USAF Weapons School.